Saturday, March 5, 2011

Ice. . . the good kind

Time to unveil the big surprise! Shaved Ice! A local entrepreneur (and a pastor as well) has, with our permission of course, moved his little shaved ice shack onto our property, and we will be helping him out with water and electricity this summer when he opens up. Yes, finally there will be something to eat in Afton! Besides the shaved ice, he will be serving hot dogs, nachos, and frito chili pies. This is going to be disaster for my diet, but a wonderful addition to Afton Station and a treat for the travelers who stop by, many of whom have, in the past, asked where they could get a bite to eat or a drink on a hot summer day. The shack is called "Eagle's" because that's the name of the Afton High School teams. Good thinking, as the local kids will probably be regular customers, too. It should be open for business around April 1. (And I can already taste one of those Pina Colada Shaved Ices!)

Other than that excitement, it was a very quiet day at Afton Station. I think it may have had something to do with the cold weather. Spring has disappeared for a little while, and it was a mere 30 degrees when Ron M. and I arrived this morning. We had only 5 guests, and two of those were of the canine variety! In the morning, a nice lady from Romeoville, IL traveling Route 66 alone stopped in. Four years ago, on her 66th birthday, she and three other 66-year-old friends decided to take a Route 66 trip. However, they had so much fun visiting every site and talking to everyone along the way that, by the end of the week, they had only made it to Oklahoma City. So, the lady who visited today was going to try to make it a little further this time.

Later in the day, a couple from Big Cabin, OK stopped in with their cute dogs, Bill and Li'l Bit. Adorable little pugs, but I can't recall the exact variety. Well behaved doggies, and their people were well behaved, too. :-)
While Ron M. was outside taking photos of the Shaved Ice Shack, one of those trucks hauling a wind turbine blade happened to drive past, so Ron quickly snapped this picture. It really illustrates the enormous size of the blades, and the photo only shows about two thirds of its length!
Inspired, I suspect, by the neat Reflections photo I showed here a few days ago, Ron snapped this picture in the showroom this afternoon. Very nice, Ron!

I took this one in the semi-light this morning in Tulsa. A magnolia tree in bloom is such a hopeful sign of spring just around the corner. . . I hope.
Betty W. stopped by today and stayed for an hour or two. Always great to have Betty around! I'll be in Afton again tomorrow, so come on down, folks. I don't want to sit around all alone!

13 comments:

Bucko (a.k.a., Ken) said...

Excellent, great addition.

Susan Yates said...

The snack shack is bound to be popular with travelers and Aftonites (Aftonians?)alike.

Our family always called pink magnolias tulip trees. Perhaps that's a Southern thing.

Laurel said...

Susan, I've heard both terms, too. I suspect that "tulip tree" is the more "botanic" term, but I haven't looked it up yet.

Trevor Hilton said...

That's great! Maybe if you parked a car or two near his place it would draw people over there, too.
And maybe a picnic table or two near it.

I'm starting to get hungry for some nachos with a few jalipinos on top.

Beth said...

Frito chili pie? YUM! I bet they'll do pretty good business.

Yes, some people around here call magnolias "tulip trees." I'm not sure of the origins of the misnomer. Either way, they're pretty!

Jen said...

Oh, the snack shack sounds wonderful! I agree with Trevor that a picnic table or two would be a perfect addition.

Susan Yates said...

Well, Laurel, you made me look up tulip tree. You know librarians take reference questions seriously! Turns out, it is the proper name for the tree you photographed. It's scientic name is Liriodendron tulipifera a name that was erroneously given to the tree because its blossoms resembled tulips. But tulips are from the lily family and this tree is actually from the magnolia family. So when we call those beautiful trees pink magnolias we're right because that's what they are--but ironically their name is tulip tree!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liriodendron_tulipifera

Laurel said...

Picnic tables are a great idea, but would be something the owner of the Shack would have to decide upon, since we have no financial connection to the business other than providing utilities and space. We hope he decides to do that.

Laurel said...

Susan,

In the north, we called them tulip trees. I love the idea of calling them magnolias here because it sounds so "southern". I'm aware that true magnolias are something else altogether, and are only found in the deep(er) south.

Susan Yates said...

Go right on calling them pink magnolias, Laurel. Both names are used around here so you shouldn't have any trouble being understood. We need to locate some true magnolias for you. They do indeed grow in this part of the country and they get very BIG.

redforkhippie said...

Ooooo, I hope it's the superfine shaved ice that has a texture like real snow, and not the coarser kind that makes your tongue numb and hurts your teeth to eat. I have been known to drive all the way out to the shaved-ice trailer under the canopy of a video store in Weatherford just to get white pina colada snow cones. They were divine -- slightly heavier on the coconut than the pineapple, and the texture was perfect. Afton is MUCH closer than Weatherford. :)

Laurel said...

I don't know, Em. We'll have to wait and see. I'm hoping it's the coarser kind because then I can have more of it. The coarser ice melts down to less fluid, and as you know I have to limit my fluids. And of course I have every intention of getting completely addicted to the stuff.

masonsgranny59 said...

I live in afton:) I will have to come by and visit some time :) good location:)